Autumn is a Season for two things: Elections and partisan promotion of the ACA’s Health Plan Exchanges. Boy, do facts get skewed for both!

I know my title was remiss by not including football and the World Series both of which are far more fun than mid-term elections or the ACA open enrollment period. Remember, this is a healthcare blog so I will stay on message.

I don’t want to address the facts, stats, and promises politicians make at election time but I do want to point out a few corrections or misunderstandings (make that mis-information) that ACA supporters use to promote the Government run Health Exchanges at Open Enrollment (OE). You see Autumn or rather the Fall season signals the coming Open Enrollment period for Government run Exchanges so the proponents of the ACA, which includes most of the Media, many Think Tanks and Foundations and all Democrats work to sell the Government run program to our citizens.

How do they do that? They start with some statistics reported in a manner that supports their position even if it requires a skewing of the facts, which we’ve witnessed in the past. As your humble author has written before, the media has often delivered a biased lopsided view of the current status of the health plans that we all require. They write of Out of Pocket costs, of higher deductibles, of pre-existing conditions, of premium increases, of provider access and even lack of choices in a manner that suits their agenda.

Which is to scare the common sense out of people so that single-payer government-run healthcare sounds like a good idea.

Recent reports are cheering the modest increases in premiums this Fall. For example, Covered California is bragging that the premiums for SHOP, the exchange for small employers, are increasing only 8.3%. We’ve discussed this issue before and revealed the real facts concerning the status of premiums.

First, what other good or service in your life is increasing its cost by 8.3% this year. And, if it did, would you be satisfied with the benefit of that good or service?

Second, the 8.3% increase is multiplied times a rate that has already been increased by as much as 300% over the past 7 years. We’ve discussed the impact of compound interest before, haven’t we?

But, proponents (Democrats and media) have to try to sell their product and to do so requires a real “sales job”.

Another set of facts released deal with the increase in “plan deductible”. The data clearly shows that the deductibles we have on our plans has been steadily increasing. For Employer sponsored plans statistics reveal that:

  • 85% of members have a deductible on their plan
    (10 years ago it was 59%. In 2000 it was less that 25%)
  • the average plan deductible selected by applicants is $1573 up from $1505 a year ago. That’s a 5% increase in deductible in addition to increased premium.
  • 25% of Employer plans offer a deductible of $2,000 or higher.
    (These employers need to add an HRA for their EEs)
  • Plan deductible is just a portion of Out of Pocket costs which is an issue for many and we’ve discussed in many Posts.

What do all of these statistics have in common? They are driven by increasing premiums which is the predictable outcome of an overly regulated government-run healthcare system.

As we’ve discussed before 152 million Americans (close to 60%)  get their health plan from their Employer. So, we should ask a few questions in order to maintain a solid fact-based rational for this mess.

  • Q: Why do Employers spend any money to provide a health plan?
    A: To attract and maintain a competitive workforce.
  • Q: Do Employers want to offer a health plan with huge OOP?
    A: No, they want to provide the richest plan possible.
  • Q: What is the primary reason driving Employers to provide plans with higher deductibles and OOP?
    A: Premium costs! Employer premium costs have tripled in past 7 years!
  • Q: Would Employers offer richer plans if they were affordable?
    A: Absolutely, they want to retain the best workforce possible and rich benefit plans help assure that goal!

Remember, current data shows that there are more open jobs available than people seeking a job. That means competition for employees.

Sometimes, I wonder why an Employer would purchase its group benefit plan through a Government run Exchange. There are probably a couple of reasons.
The Employer:

  • May believe it is too small to get a private group plan.
  • May not be able to meet participation  guidelines of private plans.
  • May not have a good insurance broker to guide it.
  • May be uninformed or mis-led to believe an Exchange is the only option.

Almost anything can be packaged and promoted to sound appealing.
For example: let’s say that you are selling cars but only offer your cars in the color white. However, your competitors offer cars in many different colors including white. Would you need to promote your cars in a manner that made potential customers think that your cars in white were better than the competitors cars in various colors?
Of course you would or else you go out of business.
However, if you were being subsidized by the government then you could say almost anything to compete.

We’ve discussed in previous Posts that the media will be increasingly bold in its attacks on pre-ex, premium leveling off, OOP on plans as well as unexpected OOP, choice and many other areas to support candidates in the mid-terms coming in November. We need to continue to be aware and make others aware so that these scare tactics do not work!

That’s why we’re all in this together! To help one another.

Until next week.

Mark Reynolds, RHU
559-250-2000
mark@reynolds.wtf
It means “Walk the Faith”.

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