A special post Mother’s Day Post. Everyone has or had a Mother and we generally honor them on Mother’s Day. But do you ever wonder what your delivery cost your Mother? Let’s look.

I know that you are reading this after Mom’s special day but give me two minutes to enlighten you on the cost to your Mom, at least medical cost, of bringing you in to this world. Now, I can’t address all that you cost your Mom since then but that is another day.

The tipping point for maternity costs, all medical costs really, was 1967 and the Medicare Act. Yep, that grand old bill that 80+ million Americans count on today was the catalyst for an explosion in healthcare costs.

My first daughter was born in 1986. When we visited the hospital where she would be delivered we were ushered into a room with dozens of other hopeful couples. The hospital staff’s goal was to convince us to utilize their hospital when our lucky day arrived. So, they presented all of the terrific features the hospital offered as well promoted their staff as being experienced, caring and loveing what they do.

The hospital administrator presented several option for delivery each having a different price attached as well as easy payment plans, if desired.

  • If you just planned to stop in, pop out the new little one, then go home in less than 22 hours the cost would be $1,800. I remember the 22 hours comment specifically because I remembered thinking, how does someone get in, deliver a child, and get out in 22 hours.
  • Then, for you more traditional types who plan to take your time, labor for 20 hours, then get some rest before you go home and the cost would be $5,600. I remember the $5,600 because it struck me as an arbitrary number and I wondered how many times they actually kept to that estimate.
    Heck, we all know aspirin cost $12-$18, depending on time of day.
  • Now, for you couples who might have a little complication in delivery or just want to choose the day and time of day your baby is born, they offered cesarean or C-section delivery. That was $12,800. For that price they’ll let you stay 3-4 days, teach the Dad how to change a diaper and feed you a steak & lobster dinner on your last night. Got to admit, the steak and lobster was pretty good.

That experience was at a respected hospital in the west San Fernando Valley of California. These prices, as well as last meal, vary greatly as one crosses the country.

I remember people telling me what a delivery would cost in “the old days”. Great friends of ours, who were 30 years older, regaled me with stories of how their first son, born in 1953 cost $250. Plus they paid the nurse $50, just because she was so nice to them.
I’ve had dinner for 4 in the San Fernando Valley that cost more than $250.

We’ve all heard the stories of the doctor getting paid a couple of chickens or a prize pig for his OB work. I can’t imagine the anguish of giving up my prize pig. That’ll make sense for those of you who know my origins.

On the other end of the spectrum there are the unfortunate many who have premature or early delivery or other complications. In 1993, I heard Leonard Schaffer, former CEO of Blue Cross of Ca., state to a group that  Blue Cross of Ca. had a $1 million baby born every week. He did not mean it in any glib sense but only as a fact related to healthcare cost that would be meaningful to the group.

In 2018, babies are as adorable as ever but a lot more expensive. Again, I’m speaking only of delivery, not the other stuff they cost their parents. But as we celebrate or rather celebrated Mother’s Day we should all reflect on this lesson to share with our kids.

Abstinence is the only means to 100% prevent pregnancy. Seriously.
Jeez, that sounded like Smokey the Bear and his forest fire warning. That doesn’t work either.

The point in this post Mother’s Day Post is that we love our Mom’s, or the memories of our Mom’s and this day gives us a chance to pause to be thankful. But also that it’s a great example of how healthcare has changed in both services available and costs. It also amplifies the urgency to solve the crisis in healthcare cost and access.
Plus, because of our Mom, we’re all in this together!

Until next week.

Mark Reynolds, RHU
559-250-2000
mark@reynolds.wtf

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