Trump Administration releasing new standards for Short-term Medical Plans. Is this good, bad, no big deal? Let’s discuss.

President Trump’s administration has released “new rules” which will allow Short Term Medical Plans (STM) to be offered for up to 12 months. This is good news for tens of thousands of Americans but it will cause ACA advocates to go crazy. Which is kind of fun to watch, actually.

In the past I’ve not talked about STMs as they were restricted by the ACA and certain states which prevented STMs from being a long-term or even intermediate term solution for reforming our healthcare issues. STMs had been designed:

  •  As temporary coverage, lasting for a few months. while
  • For workers  between jobs.
  • To provide limited protection.
  • Portions of hospital or doctor bills.
  • Not to be long-term coverage us it made sense to member.

But, premiums have increased 300% over the past 7 years and out of pocket limits on ACA compliant plans have increased to a point where they can cause financial ruin. No one, who avidly or rabidly supports the ACA, wants to admit or acknowledge that the increase premiums are paid primarily by un-subsidized population of American. Stated more clearly, people who don’t received subsidies pay the brunt of these increased costs.

 “We want to open up affordable alternatives to unaffordable Affordable Care Act policies,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar. “This is one step in the direction of providing Americans health insurance options that are more affordable and more suitable to individual and family circumstances.”

STMs could add more options at potentially a fraction of the premium of ACA plans. STMs would help healthy folks, strapped financially by ACA plans, in both big city and urban areas but certainly in the rural areas of the country.

Opponents will argue at least three issues for the downside of STMs. The first is that STMs will dilute ACA compliant plans as the premium paying healthy folks seek out and obtain coverage from a lower priced STM. If you were healthy and could slash your health plan premium by 50-75%, would you try it? Heck, Yeah!

Currently, under the ACA, STMs are offered generally for only 90 days at a time then must be renewed. Generally speaking their benefit designs are “crap” as one would honestly describe. One can’t blame an insurer for a low cost “crappy” plan when it knows its customer could use the plan then be gone in less than 90 days. Insurers could never sustain a reasonably designed plan with Rx copays and high limits on coverage because a single episode of care would wipe out reserves.

But, we have not yet seen what the market will demand of STMs when they can be offered for up to 12 months. An insurer then could assume that members would retain coverage for a longer period and thus may be able offer plans a bit richer in benefits while still a fraction of ACA plan prices. We’ll see about this.

There are reports from folks at CMS (Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services) estimate that these STMs might attract up to 200,000 members nationally. That estimate could be dead-on accurate or wildly off. But, since the majority of working Americans receive their benefits through their employer it may in the ballpark.

I said above that opponents would argue three issues. The second is that acquiring coverage requires folks to answer health related questions on the application, and insurers can reject applicants with preexisting medical problems.  ACA plans cannot underwrite applicants and cannot refuse coverage even if an applicant is in an ambulance heading for the hospital. 

The third issue opponents will absolutely hate is the benefit design of these STMs. STMs will certainly not include the Essential Health Benefits or pediatric dental, or maybe even wellness/preventive benefits. STMs will be designed and be appealing to healthy folks

Opponents will argue that citizens will be uninformed about the plan benefits and be buying plans that do not provide the coverage that our citizens require. Opponents will not give these healthy premium paying Americans and credit for wisdom or discernment.

Those are three very important objections and they must be addressed because there will be some states, such as Ca, that will not like STMs and will fight there presence in the state’s market.

But, the primary objectors will be:

  • Rabid ACA supporters who actually want the ACA to morph into single-payer plans, but are intellectually dishonest about their motive.
  •  Insurers who have been collecting huge premiums and reporting record profits will fear losing healthy members who are paying their ACA inflated premiums.

Will STMs be “skinny plans” which applicants need to clearly understand, yes. But, American shoppers are pretty savvy plus they can access insurance professionals to help.

What do critics say, “the proposed regulations for offering ACA non-compliant plans along with the alleged elimination of the individual mandate by Congress could render the Affordable Care Act even less viable”.

 Others will state that these plans won’t include critical benefits such as mental health coverage which in in the news so much lately due to the apparently mentally impaired man in the Florida school shooting.

These objections shouting “buyer beware”, “there are no benefit” these plans will cause death” will be replayed by the liberal media so much you will wish you could listen to a “ZYPPAH” commercial.

One by-product could be that if the ACA compliant plans are impaired, due partially to eroding healthy membership, it might accelerate the death of the ACA or creation of more alternatives. That would take time but if Congress won’t do the job then maybe time and circumstances will.

Robert Lasewski an industry consultant says, “If consumers think Obamacare premiums are high today, wait until people flood into these short-term and association health plans.” He adds, “The Trump administration will bring rates down substantially for healthy people, but woe unto those who get a condition and have to go back into Obamacare.”

Remember what we’ve said in previous Post, the ACA punishes the many to provide benefits for the few. The opponents of these plans fail to understand or at least empathize with the millions of Americans paying huge premiums each month for benefits they don’t or can’t use but get not subsidy. Let’s help those folks once in awhile.

Christopher Condeluci, a benefits attorney who also served as tax counsel to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee states, “While these plans might not be the best answer, people do need a choice, and this new proposal provides needed choice to a certain subsection of the population.”

Comments like that make me realize that I’m not alone in thinking the American people deserve options. They deserve our support and they deserve a break, for once.

To summarize, STMs will:

  • Offer alternative for healthy Americans.
  • Be a fraction or premiums charged by ACA plans.
  • Provide fewer benefits than ACA compliant plans.
  • Include underwriting that could reject applicants request for coverage.
  • Be very profitable for insurers.

But STMs may:

  • Take healthy members away from ACA plans.
  • Leave ACA plans with more unhealthy than healthy members.
  • Cause ACA plan premiums to increase further.
  • Still be profitable for insurers.

The piece by piece dismantling of the ACA is not a perfect scenario. But if you remember, the ACA piece by piece dismantled all of the great aspects of American healthcare plans starting in 2010. If the piece by piece process is the only way that America can be offered better options then it is a worthy endeavor. The ACA can be slowly eliminated which would give us the time to adjust and improve.

What do you think? We’re in this together so let us know.

Until next week.

Mark Reynolds, RHU
559-250-2000
mark@reynolds.wtf
It stands for “Walk the Faith”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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